28/05/2016

The Top 5 Rock Guitar Solos of All Time

5. “Sultans of Swing”—Mark Knopfler



"Sultans of Swing" is a song by the British rock band Dire Straits from their eponymous debut album, which band frontman Mark Knopfler wrote and composed. Although it was first released in 1978, it was its 1979 re-release that caused it to become a hit in both the UK and U.S.

4. “Free Bird”—Gary Rossington and Allen Collins



"Free Bird", or "Freebird", is a power ballad by the American rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd. The song was first featured on the band's debut album in 1973 and has been included on subsequent albums released by the band, including the previously unreleased, unfaded-ending version of the original recording (featured on Skynyrd's Innyrds). Amazon.com music reviewer Lorry Fleming calls it "the most-requested song in the history of rock music."

3. “Eruption”—Eddie Van Halen



"Eruption" is an instrumental rock guitar solo performed by Eddie Van Halen. It is widely considered one of the greatest guitar solos of all time. It segues into "You Really Got Me" on the album Van Halen, and the two songs are often played together by radio stations. The song was also released as the b-side to the "Runnin' with the Devil" single.

2. “All Along the Watchtower”—Jimi Hendrix



"All Along the Watchtower" is a song written and recorded by the American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. The song initially appeared on his 1967 album John Wesley Harding, and it has been included on most of Dylan's subsequent greatest hits compilations. Since the late 1970s, he has performed it in concert more than any of his other songs. Different versions appear on four of Dylan's live albums.[1]

1. “Little Wing”—Stevie Ray Vaughan



"Little Wing" is a song written by Jimi Hendrix and recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1967. It is a slower tempo, rhythm and blues-inspired ballad featuring Hendrix's vocal and guitar with recording studio effects accompanied by bass, drums, and glockenspiel. Lyrically, it is one of several of his songs that reference an idealized feminine or guardian angel-like figure. At about two and a half minutes in length, it is one of his most concise and melodically-focused pieces.

The article has been compiled from wikipedia.com and guitarplayer.com